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Will Justice Ever Be Blind?
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The Spectator
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 by Laramie Boyd
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2013 Spectator Ron - The Spectator All Rights Reserved
C
        The only thing less surprising about the Zimmerman case than the verdict, was that there would be the typical mob reactions by a certain segment of society when things didn't go their way. I'm trying to recall a criminal case where a member of a minority was acquitted of killing a white person, and the white community rioted over the decision. (Does O.J. ring a bell?) I'm wondering if the grandchildren of the grandchildren of my grandchildren will even then have to hear the call of "racial discrimination" whenever a person is not convicted of murdering another person, not because of whether he is found guilty in a court of law or not, but rather just because of some skin color difference.
        Was that President Obama who "threw his two cents worth" into the Zimmerman trial and spoke out in a situation where The Rule of Law should be paramount, not some personal preference, like where he said if he had a son, that son would look like Trayvon Martin, in a rather obvious slant that George Zimmerman should have been found guilty. Zimmerman was tried in a court of law and found innocent. We can't let this become the rule of thumb in criminal trials, where the accused and accuser are of different races and the verdict is based on this fact. I believe it is not the duty nor the responsibility nor the role of the President of the United States to voice opinions referring to current criminal trials, particularly only when black plaintiffs are involved. Would Eric Holder, arguably the most incompetent and under qualified Attorney General in our history, be looking for his brand of "justice" if George Zimmerman was black, and Trayvon Martin was not? Notice that Holder has just come out against laws that allow a person who believes he is in danger to use deadly force in self-defense. I seriously wonder whether he means the white man or the black man should not use deadly force if he is in danger.
        So often, people jump to conclusions without having all the facts. They base judgments on what the media says, what the newspapers and the TV news commentators say, and as we all know they don't always report the whole truth, and at times even the truth is slanted towards some agenda other than assuring a transparent justice system. Newspapers and TV stations want to sell their wares, and the "Barbie" doll newswomen are just as much interested in their appearance as they are reporting the accurate who, what, when, where, how and why of events. Ratings seem to rule.
        Can you guess how many of the rioters were in the courtroom when the trial was under way and saw or heard the deliberations? Or how many of them knew the complete testimony of the witnesses, and what is considered evidence and what is not. How many of them even know that only the proceedings in the courtroom are considered when the jury ponders innocence or guilt, not what some journalist says in a newspaper or what some reporter screams over the tube, or what the President insinuates. Do these protestors know what the legal difference is between manslaughter and 2nd degree murder? And how many of the protestors, who have a perfect right to protest, fully understand that that's the way justice works in America? And when that system fails, when mobs who scream the loudest in protest are the swing votes in trials, that's when chaos reigns. Maybe Zimmerman's verdict was misplaced, maybe not. That is a moot point. What is not moot is whether, with the help of the level headed segment of the black community, rioting, looting, and potentially all sorts of violence can be averted.
        Under the current administration, do you really believe that America is one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all? How easy it would be to show examples of a divided country, republican vs. democrat, black vs. white: where sometimes even the word God is taboo, in classrooms and courthouses; where freedoms are disappearing too often, in speech and invasion of privacy by the government; and many times justice is only a word, as criminals are released from prison en masse, or given much too light sentences. Certainly past administrations were also negligent in these regards, but couldn't you say it seems quite a bit worse now than it has been in the recent past?