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Is That a Trump Card Under His Sleeve
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The Spectator
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 by Laramie Boyd
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2015 Spectator Ron - The Spectator All Rights Reserved
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        In your lifetime, have you ever witnessed a presidential candidate who didn't renege on a campaign pledge made before he was elected. It seems that Donald Trump has made some campaign promises that beg to be challenged as blowing smoke just to get some votes. Some pledges are rather vague as to method of implementation, but his message is clear. He plans to strengthen the military, take care (?) of the veterans, bring jobs back from other countries, get rid of Obamacare, be great to women (?), and get Congress to pass whatever he wants done. He suggests that he has bought votes before and will do it again, taking advantage of his belief that Congressmen can be bought. That's hard to argue with. But don't count on 100% of these pledges getting accomplished even if he is elected. In the real world, 50% would be shocking. In fact if need be he says he'll spend $1,000,000,000, that's one billion dollars, if that's what it takes to get elected. And then, he boasts, solving the immigration dilemma and excessive number of tax laws are first priorities. You gotta admit, he has high hopes.
        But promising some program and then not following through on it is nothing new in American politics, especially at the presidential level. Our current president, Barack Hussein Obama, promised that under his health plan you could keep your present plan, period, vowed to have openness in the operations of government, also to reduce health care costs, he rejected spying on citizens, would close Guantanamo, eliminate taxes on senior citizens making less that $50,000, and cut the deficit in half. These broken promises, call them lies if you will, are only some of the documented 23 promises the president made and didn't carry out. Ever in our minds are George H.W. Bush's immortal words, "Read my lips, I will not raise taxes." How long did that last?
        So, The Donald has a chance to set a new precedent, if he will, in case he wins the 2016 race for president. Are his improving ratings based on a belief by supporters that he will do as he says? Or just because of an endless bravado that can't be ignored? Anyway, does he care what people think if he doesn't meet all of his goals? I'm sure his "I can't be bought" theme is somehow music to the ears of voters. But reluctance to believe what Trump promises will be hard to overcome. Maybe he can buy off a few million voters with his Forbes $4 billion estimated worth, or is it $10 billion, as he says? Who do we believe?