>
Amina: A Student's Desire, or One That I Noticed
Your comments about this column are welcome ~ e-mail Frank at
The Spectator
founded 2004 by ron cruger
A place for intelligent writers
A place for intelligent readers
 by Frank Shortt
shafra@sbcglobal.net
2019 Spectator Ron - The Spectator All Rights Reserved
C

A lone student wends her way each morning to the local Junior College to take advantage of all her opportunities in her adopted land. She walks proudly, not with bowed head, but with the look of one who is determined to succeed!

Amina’s family came to the Land of the Free, not without struggles, but instead they came against all odds from Africa’s deep, rich soil to an unknown and unproven existence. Plucked up by the roots, as it were, from being grounded firm in her native land, she was now transplanted into America’s promise of a better life.

Amina brightened each room she entered with her ready smile. As she mingled with other students, she brought bits of old wisdom from her life in a squalid village, brought up by parents who only wished the best for their daughter. She flourished among cactus barbs as she replaced old ways with new without losing the importance of the way she was taught before.

Hair braided in corn rows like furrowed fields of flax, eyes as bright as starlight, she faced life’s challenge. Her determination affected the other students and caused them to reach for greater goals. It was not unusual for Amina to remain after the other students had dispersed to question the beleaguered professor with deep inquiries as to what he meant by this or that. She was forced onward by her deep desire to become a physician and serve those of the ghettos of America, succoring those who were less fortunate than herself.

As Amina faces the rigors of society, replacing old values with the new, will she maintain her thoughts of being a succor to others? After she becomes accustomed to the life that America has to offer, will she forget the small one-roomed structure, fashioned after the Pyramids of Egypt, that she spent the first twelve years of her life in? Will she forget the walls of daubed mud, haven for all crawling vermin? Or, will she remember her goal? Will she be a doctor for the underprivileged children of the American ghettos? Will her eyes retain their brightness as her flaxen hair turns prematurely grey from the rigors demanded of her to maintain and surpass what it takes to become great in America? As Amina plays out her desires, will something interrupt her chosen path? Will marriage come? Will another desire flood her busy soul? Or will she remain the ever-young student of life on this earth? After all, we are the Land of Opportunity!